Guide A World Made New: Eleanor Roosevelt and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

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A World Made New by Mary Ann Glendon | ekexakofoj.ga

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Mar 30, Pages. A World Made New is the dramatic and inspiring story of the remarkable group of men and women from around the world who participated in this historic achievement and gave us the founding document of the modern human rights movement.

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Spurred on by the horrors of the Second World War and working against the clock in the brief window of hope between the armistice and the Cold War, they grappled together to articulate a new vision of the rights that every man and woman in every country around the world should share, regardless of their culture or religion.

Finalist for the Robert F. A World Made New tells the dramatic story of the struggle to build, out of the trauma and wreckage of World War II, a document that would ensure it would never happen again. There was an almost religious intensity to the project, championed by Eleanor Roosevelt under the aegis of the newly formed United nations and brought into being by an extraordinary group of men and women who knew, like the framers of the Declaration of Independence, that they were making history.

A World Made New

They worked against the clock, the brief window between the end of World War II and the deep freeze of the cold war, to forget the founding document of the modern rights movement. Taken together, these books provide a far richer picture about the UDHR than have the scores of articles, chapters and even books written about it earlier. The drafters of the document faced a double challenge.

Both superpowers strongly preferred to safeguard national sovereignty as well as the UK and France, still possessors of large colonial empires and wanted little more than a declaration of principles.

Besides, both the latter could, from on, find a basis for international protection of human rights through the European Convention. Secondly, means of enforcement had to be devised. Underlying both the legal agreement and the means of enforcement was a philosophical framework that would not unduly privilege any particular tradition.

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The Universal Declaration of Human Rights provided this third element. Though derided as a collection of contradictory platitudes, the UDHR has proven to have remarkable staying ability. Standing apart from the machinery of enforcement, it achieved "an independent moral status in world affairs and law. The two authors see the UDHR as truly global in scope.

A World Made New: Eleanor Roosevelt and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

It was initially drafted by persons drawn from or trained in the "Western tradition," both note, thereby opening the charge of cultural relativism. Criticisms of the Declaration "will probably grow in intensity and frequency because the universalist agenda of liberalism is closely aligned with that of universal human rights.

Book Review: A World Made New|Exposition #2

Glendon is equally pointed about the global reach of the Declaration. It is the similarity among persons that makes universal human rights possible. Drawing the least discussion, in fact, were the first dozen or so articles, which embody the tenets of Western liberal civil and political rights which existed in the constitutions of practically all countries. The strong support given in committee stages paved the way for the historic adoption without dissent of the UDHR as a whole 10 December Even earlier, however, there was extensive input in drafting of the Declaration's thirty articles: